One-day Meditation on Mindfulness of the Body (Kāyānupassanā)

Samatha Vipassana Meditation Centre is pleased to offer the fourth one-day special meditation retreat for regular participants and beginners on Saturday March 4th from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm at SVMC (3454 - 37 Street NW, Edmonton). This retreat will be based on mindfulness of the body (Kāyānupassanā). If you would like to participate in this great meritorious deed, please sign up by submitting the form in the page below:


http://www.abva.org/forms/one-day-retreat-signup


Space is limited to 25 participants. Individuals who sign up after this limit will be kept in a waiting list. If you signed up but cannot attend for any reason, please let us know at least by March 1st so that we can inform the participants in the waiting list.


Lunch will be kindly provided by Samitha & Pemarathne,  Nishani & Jayathilaka families.


You are kindly requested to read the following excerpts from the Satipattāna sutta prior to attending this retreat. We will be practicing most of the activities described in these excerpts during the retreat, besides sitting meditation.


The Four Postures

“Again, bhikkhus, when walking, a bhikkhu understands: ‘I am walking’; when standing, he understands: ‘I am standing’; when sitting, he understands: ‘I am sitting’; when lying down, he understands: ‘I am lying down’; or he understands accordingly however his body is disposed.”


“In this way he abides contemplating the “body as a body internally, externally, and both internally and externally… And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That too is how a bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body.”


Full Awareness

“Again, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu is one who acts in full awareness when going forward and returning; who acts in full awareness when looking ahead and looking away; who acts in full awareness when flexing and extending his limbs; who acts in full awareness when wearing his robes and carrying his outer robe and bowl; who acts in full awareness when eating, drinking, consuming food, and tasting; who acts in full awareness when defecating and urinating; who acts in full awareness when walking, standing, sitting, falling asleep, waking up, talking, and keeping silent.”


“In this way he abides contemplating the body as a body internally, externally, and both internally and externally… And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That too is how a bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body.”